Endometrial Hyperplasia

What is endometrial hyperplasia?

Endometrial hyperplasia occurs when the endometrium, the lining of the uterus, becomes too thick. It is not cancer, but in some cases, it can lead to cancer of the uterus.

How does the endometrium normally change throughout the menstrual cycle?

The endometrium changes throughout the menstrual cycle in response to hormones. During the first part of the cycle, the hormone estrogen is made by the ovaries. Estrogen causes the lining to grow and thicken to prepare the uterus for pregnancy. In the middle of the cycle, an egg is released from one of the ovaries (ovulation). Following ovulation, levels of another hormone called progesterone begin to increase. Progesterone prepares the endometrium to receive and nourish a fertilized egg. If pregnancy does not occur, estrogen and progesterone levels decrease. The decrease in progesterone triggers menstruation, or shedding of the lining. Once the lining is completely shed, a new menstrual cycle begins.

What causes endometrial hyperplasia?

Endometrial hyperplasia most often is caused by excess estrogen without progesterone. If ovulation does not occur, progesterone is not made, and the lining is not shed. The endometrium may continue to grow in response to estrogen. The cells that make up the lining may crowd together and may become abnormal. This condition, called hyperplasia, may lead to cancer in some women.

When does endometrial hyperplasia occur?

Endometrial hyperplasia usually occurs after menopause, when ovulation stops and progesterone is no longer made. It also can occur during perimenopause, when ovulation may not occur regularly. Listed as follows are other situations in which

women may have high levels of estrogen and not enough progesterone:

  • Use of medications that act like estrogen
  • Long-term use of high doses of estrogen after menopause (in women who have not had a hysterectomy)
  • Irregular menstrual periods, especially associated with polycystic ovary syndrome or infertility
  • Obesity

What risk factors are associated with endometrial hyperplasia?

Endometrial hyperplasia is more likely to occur in women with the following risk factors:

  • Age older than 35 years
  • White race
  • Never having been pregnant
  • Older age at menopause
  • Early age when menstruation started
  • Personal history of certain conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, gallbladder disease, or thyroid disease
  • Obesity
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Family history of ovarian, colon, or uterine cancer

What are the types of endometrial hyperplasia?

Endometrial hyperplasia is classified as simple or complex. It also is classified by whether certain cell changes are present or absent. If abnormal changes are present, it is called atypical. The terms are combined to describe the exact

kind of hyperplasia:

  • Simple hyperplasia
  • Complex hyperplasia
  • Simple atypical hyperplasia
  • Complex atypical hyperplasia

What are signs and symptoms of endometrial hyperplasia?

The most common sign of hyperplasia is abnormal uterine bleeding. If you have any of the following, you should see your health care provider:

  • Bleeding during the menstrual period that is heavier or lasts longer than usual
  • Menstrual cycles that are shorter than 21 days (counting from the first day of the menstrual period to the first day of the next menstrual period)
  • Any bleeding after menopause

How is endometrial hyperplasia diagnosed?

There are many causes of abnormal uterine bleeding. If you have abnormal bleeding and you are 35 years or older, or if you are younger than 35 years and your abnormal bleeding has not been helped by medication, your health care provider may perform diagnostic tests for endometrial hyperplasia and cancer.

Transvaginal ultrasound may be done to measure the thickness of the endometrium. For this test, a small device is placed in your vagina. Sound waves from the device are converted into images of the pelvic organs. If the endometrium is thick, it may mean that endometrial hyperplasia is present.

The only way to tell for certain that cancer is present is to take a small sample of tissue from the endometrium and study it under a microscope. This can be done with an endometrial biopsy, dilation and curettage, or hysteroscopy.

What treatments are available for endometrial hyperplasia?

In many cases, endometrial hyperplasia can be treated with progestin. Progestin is given orally, in a shot, in an intrauterine device, or as a vaginal cream. How much and how long you take it depends on your age and the type of hyperplasia. Treatment with progestin may cause vaginal bleeding like a menstrual period.

If you have atypical hyperplasia, especially complex atypical hyperplasia, the risk of cancer is increased. Hysterectomy usually is the best treatment option if you do not want to have any more children.

What can I do to help prevent endometrial hyperplasia?

You can take the following steps to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia:

  • If you take estrogen after menopause, you also need to take progestin or progesterone.
  • If your menstrual periods are irregular, birth control pills (oral contraceptives) may be recommended. They contain estrogen along with progestin. Other forms of progestin also may be taken.
  • If you are overweight, losing weight may help. The risk of endometrial cancer increases with the degree of obesity.

Reference: The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Endometrial-Hyperplasia

Patient Login

Logging in is easy as 1 2 3

  • 1 Log in with your user name (email address) and password (hit Change/reset password link to create a password for your account. Do not register for an account, this will create a duplicate)
  • 2 Under Manage My Health Record complete the tabs of information about your health. Under Reports and Tools click view Recent Test Results to see a digital copy of your lab results.
  • 3 Under Contact and Communication click Check My Inbox to see messages from the office.
Website designed by WRS Health © 2018
Stay Connected: